Drug Rehabilitation Blog

spouses of addicts

Spouses of Addicts: How to Cope After Your Loved One Enters Rehab

No one wants to believe that addiction can happen to them or their spouse. But with the way the world is today, with drugs being pushed harder than ever before, many spouses may find themselves confronting some tough choices.

Addiction can be one of the hardest situations to face, especially when it affects your marriage partner. There are many obstacles to overcome throughout the addiction recovery process, from the persistent threat of relapse, anger, feelings of hopelessness, broken trust, and guilt. But not all is lost, there is hope. When getting someone into rehab, such as your spouse, there are steps that can be taken to help you handle what is most likely a very overwhelming situation.

Addiction and Your Spouse

For example, learn more about the disease of addiction, avoid the blame game, find resources and support, learn how to trust again, and don’t neglect your own life. Addiction doesn’t just affect the addicted person, it affects the whole family. It can be very helpful to find a support system that knows what you and your family are going through. Many rehabilitation centers offer family counseling to help you find ways to cope with the negative feelings, broken trust, and more. You can also find out more about your community resources or contact your family health care provider to help find the best support group for you and your family’s needs.

Forgiving and supporting your loved one who is battling addiction isn’t always easy, but keep in mind that in order for them to succeed and make it through the recovery process, they will need your love, encouragement and your support. This will be made all the harder if you neglect your own needs. Now that you’ve discovered your spouse has this addiction, you may ask yourself “How do I get them the treatment they need?”

How to Get a Drug Addict into Rehab

Many addicts choose to go to rehab because family and friends helped them recognize the problem and take the necessary steps to get help. That doesn’t mean it will be an easy or pleasant process. Here are some helpful tips:

  • Learn more about addiction and treatment.
  • Do an intervention. Hold a meeting with family and friends to help your loved one recognize how their addiction is affecting him or her and the ones around them.
  • Don’t be judgmental.
  • Keep the communication lines open.
  • Don’t be reasonable. Ultimately, the choice to get treatment is up to them. But if you’ve told your spouse that they’re out of the house if they don’t seek treatment and they still decide not to get help, be firm with your decision and get them out of the house. This approach may be tough on you and your loved one, but doing any different will only teach them that you’re not serious about getting him/her into treatment.
  • Be patient.
  • If relapse occurs, don’t take it personally.
  • Support your spouses’ treatment.

When your spouse decides to start on the path to recovery, help him or her get there. Your role is to provide the support and encouragement your loved one needs so they can focus on the battle ahead. And remember that the addicted person is not the only one who can benefit from group support. There are so many addicted individuals in treatment and many of those have families who are trying to cope with similar, if not the same issues and feelings. You are not alone.

Getting your loved one the treatment that’s right for them may not be easy, but their life and your life is well worth the time and effort. To learn more about how to get someone to go to rehab, contact Best Drug Rehabilitation today.

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